The Ushalys

Made up of 2 groups, the Monarhig and the Moir

Monarhig – The Kings
Skin: Varies depending on the individual – normally a milky blue or milky green
Eye Color: Varies depending on the individual – traditionally warm colors: gold, amber, copper
Hair: Varies depending on the individual – feathers, leaves, horns, vines, snakes, etc..
Ave. Height: Varies between 6’ and 6’6” – they don’t grow taller out of respect for the Surtys.
Build: Varies depending on the individual tastes
Feeding Habits: Omnivore, leaning towards food more spiritual in nature: emotions, thoughts, passions, dreams, etc..
Reproductive Habits: Male and female coupling
Ornamentation: The Monarhig traditionally wear whatever strikes their fancy. More often than not their clothing reflects the area of their influence, such as the colors associated with a temperate rain forest, desert, or glacier. However, some have been known to wear intricate suits of armor grown and shaped with the aid of magic from various natural substances – rock, wood, ice, etc.. It is not uncommon to see a King of the Fae dressed in a robe of spider webs or a gown of snowflakes. There is no standard for the Monarhig – each will traditionally have a symbol of his station somewhere on his body – a crown, medallion, bracers, etc.. This symbol is often derived from an item passed down from their forebears or a gift given to them by the members of their clans.

Moir – The Queens
Skin: Varies depending on the individual – normally golden brown, copper, or olive hue
Eye Color: Varies depending on the individual – traditionally cool colors: violet, jade, or turquoise
Hair: Varies depending on the individual – feathers, leaves, horns, vines, snakes, etc..
Ave. Height: Between 6’ and 6’6” – as with the Monarhig, they don’t grow taller out of respect for the Surtys
Build: Varies depending on the individual tastes
Feeding Habits: Omnivore, leaning towards food more spiritual in nature: emotions, thoughts, passions, dreams, etc..
Reproductive Habits: Male and female coupling
Ornamentation: Like their Monarhig counterparts, the Moir traditionally wear whatever strikes their fancy. More often than not their clothing will change to reflect the attitude and demeanor of the lands that they govern. Whether the garment is a diaphanous silk robe or impregnable suit of armor, the Moir’s intimate relationship with the land will seep into their overall appearance. There is no mistaking an enraged Queen of the Fae as she literally storms through the halls of her sylvan palace. Like their male counterparts, the Moir wear a symbol of her station somewhere on their bodies – a ring, a diadem, a coronet, etc.. This symbol is often derived from an item passed down from their forebears or a gift given to them by the members of their clan.

The Ushalys are the other children of the Nai’Oigher. From them, the lesser Fae sprung, assuming different attributes and abilities according to their lineage. The Ushalys became the rulers over the lesser Fae and formed the Sidhe’Ohmun (SHEE-oh-MOON), “The Court of Twilight,” that included all the Ushalys and their descendants.

The Ushalys are a severely divided group that, like their Nai’Oigher parents, are very prone to conflicts and differences of opinion. In order to maintain peace and a semblance of balance, the Nai’Oigher commanded the Surtys to intervene. The priesthood consulted their seers and organized the Ushalys and their children into clans and castes, then further divided them into two groups: the Monarhig and the Moir.

The Monarhig were dubbed the Kings of Faerie and were given the task of ruling the Clans and ensuring that the Castes performed their duties. The Moir were named the Queens of Faerie and set as advisors to the Kings, but were also given a secret missive to keep the Monarhig in check. The two groups have become very polarized over the years, and their duties have given them a sense of divine right or self-righteousness that sets them above the rest of the Fae and the Duine. This sense of extreme pride has also built into a war of the sexes, something that only compounds the division of the Courts.

From this rather contentious atmosphere, a new division among the Fae arose as the Sidhe’Ohmun was divided between two factions, each ruled by a representative of the Moir or the Monarhig: the Sidhe’Lien (SHEE-li-EN) and the To’Sidhe’Lien (DO-shee-li-EN). If one is ruled by a Moir, the other is always ruled by a Monarhig, and vice-versa. These two groups espouse Traditional (To’Sidhe’Lien) and Progressive (Sidhe’Lien) philosophies in dealing with the mortal world.

The To’Sidhe’Lien are Traditionalists bent on maintaining the letter of the law when it comes to dealing with the mortal world. They are mainly comprised of isolationists and prefer to avoid contact with the Dying Lands whenever possible to keep from polluting the purity of the Fae. They feel that they can fulfill their assigned obligations from afar, without having to resort to dealing with the Duine at all. The Sidhe’Lien, however, believe that the Aiemer is inevitably going to fuse the mortal realm and the Dreaming Lands into a single kingdom. As such, they actively interact with the Duine as they go about fulfilling their duties. Most of the azh’rei are the result of Fae/Duine unions.

Both sides of the Sidhe’Ohmun feel that their way is best for the Fae, so they all spend a great deal of time and effort in trying to spread their influence. This has led to many conflicts among the long-lived Fae who do not easily change their philosophies. One conflict very nearly escalated into full-blown war, and again the Surtys were forced to intervene. Thus was created the “Parade of Champions.”

The Parade of Champions is held frequently, with each court choosing a representative to defend their philosophy and honor. The King and Queen habitually hold the competition every 50 to 60 years in order to try and gain the upper hand in the philosophical debate. They choose their champions from birth and mold them from the shadows based on their philosophies (active nurturing/mentoring vs. oppositional growth). Whichever champion fulfills the set challenge establishes the winner’s philosophy as the dominant platform until the next Parade of Champions.

Most of the time, the Sidhe’Lien will choose a mortal champion to prove that working with the Duine is in fact more powerful than remaining aloof. Sometimes this strategy works, but at other times the Sidhe’Lien lose terribly.

The Court with the majority of the wins will end up ruling out in the end. However, the Ushalys have neglected to set a definitive time limit to the competition, so the conflict could very well last for several millennia (or until someone is finally proven right…whichever comes first). In the end, very little is accomplished by these competitions other than keeping the peace between the Courts.

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